Time Travel Sci-Fi with Author Anthony Tonelli on the Books and Author’s Podcast

This is the Books and Authors Fantasy Podcast Episode 169 with Anthony Tonelli.

Good day and welcome to this episode of the Books and Authors Fantasy and Sci-Fi Podcast. I’m your host, podcaster and author of Fun Fantasy Reads, Jamie Davis. This podcast is exactly what the title says it is, a show focused on everything in fantasy books.

This show will cover everything to do with fantasy books. From Epic Fantasy, Urban Fantasy, Sword and Sorcery, and everything in between, expect to find the best and brightest authors from all the various corners of the fantasy book world. Plus we’ll add in a few other very special guests as well along the way.

Kicking things off this week with my own author update, I’m deep into the first draft of Accidental Monk, Book 7 in my Accidental Traveler series. It’s good to get back into this series with this book and I’m having fun exploring the gaming world of Fantasma again.

While I’m working on that, my editor is hard at work finishing up The Paramedic’s Sorceress, book 9 in my Extreme Medical Services series. After she’s finished with it, it goes right to my narrator, the excellent Roberto Scarlato, to start on the audiobook version. My plan is to release all versions of the book together in June, so stay tuned for more updates on that.

You can check out more information on what I’m up to, including sneak peeks of upcoming covers, special giveaways, and more, by visiting my fan group on Facebook, Jamie’s Fun Fantasy Readers and over at my website and blog, JamieDavisBooks.com. I look forward to hearing from you.

Joining us this week on the show is author Anthony Tonelli. Anthony was born in Rio Piedras, PR but grew up in New York City. He now resides in New England with his wife and two young children. He was a student at Arizona State University, where he majored in history with a focus on the American Revolution.

He has loved science fiction and horror since childhood and finally wrote his first feature book titled “Legacy” and released it in April 2021. His idea of ​​what science fiction can be takes the genre in a completely different direction. Some of his favorite sci-fi elements are time travel, the multiverse, historical fiction (in a sci-fi setting), artificial intelligence, extraterrestrial life, planetary exploration, and dystopia.

Anthony explores all of these in his book, Legacy, the first book in The Dominion Series. Here’s my chat with him about it.

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Authors in Focus Episode 94: Interview with Thomas K Davis by JMD Reid

Thomas K Davis

Hi! Welcome to this episode of Authors in Focus Podcast. I’m James Reid, a fantasy author publishing as JMD Reid. This podcast is all about getting to know writers, their books, and what makes them tick.

We all have a storyteller inside of us. Join me as we find out what the rising stars and established voices in publishing have to say about their craft and inspiration.

I am excited to say that my second fantasy series has been released as Jewels of Illumination and the first book collection is out! Jewels of Illumination Books 1-3 can be bought or borrowed on Amazon!

Today, I’m joined by Thomas K. Davis! He is the author of the fantasy/Sci Fi novel Trial by Combat (Versatile Layer Book 1)! Visit his website, follow him on FacebookInstagramTwitter, and Goodreads! And check out his Author Page!

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Interview with J. E. Mueller

J. E. Mueller

Fantasy/Sci-Fi Focus (FSF): Hey Jessica! How are you doing? How has this last year of total insanity been treating you?

J.E. Mueller (JM): Overall, good! It’s been a very strange year, but I’ve been making the most of the nonsense. Thanks for asking!

FSF: So you’re a day away from re-launching your newly re-named “A Tune of Demons” box set with Fallbrandt Press. How do you feel about that? What’s going through your mind at this moment?

JM: I think the best way to describe it is just nonstop mental screaming. When I first wrote Fire’s Song I hadn’t expected it to turn into a series, let alone a trilogy, and now a boxset. It’s been an amazing process and now everything with Fallbrandt? Words cannot describe but dkfjngklsnlkjgns sums up the feeling fairly well.

FSF: I’m not going to try to pronounce that but I do understand the sentiment. So what I’d like to begin with is the beginning of course. When did you realize you wanted to be an author, and can you take us through the journey that led to the initial self publication of Fire’s Song?

JM: I’m not sure when exactly I realized I ‘really’ wanted to be an author. I had said it enough as a kid, but it didn’t exactly feel obtainable until sometime in college. I had written plenty by that point but most of it was unfinished random ideas. The push was finally wanting the ultimate gift for my best friend’s wedding. I’ve known her since kindergarten and I wanted something that best showed our years of friendship. That’s when the idea came to not only write a story but to finally publish. I chose to redo one of the ones she enjoyed reading in high school, and so Fire’s Song came to be. It was so much fun being able to gift her one of the first copies. I don’t think many can boast that as a wedding gift.

FSF: So since this is a big re-branding why don’t you give our reading audience a taste of Fire’s Song, and the overall gist of “A Tune of Demons?” Why is this a binge worthy series?

JM: The nice thing about this whole thing, even more so with a box set, is that it’s completed. You get to see the curses, the plague demons bring, and how normal people deal with the day to day nonsense magic and packs (both good and bad) bring. It has a fun, gripping start before taking a darker tone. Demons are bad, but there is a lot of grey area that gets explored in the second book. Just because we call them ‘angels’ does that make them so? The best thing about fantasy is that rules can be broken. Everything is meant to be tested. Finally, you get to see exactly where the chose goes, how it’s impact on this one realm in particular pulses and ripples. Things could crumble, and best yet, I got to use the phrase ‘dead dead’. I love ghostly shenanigans. The best thing about this rebranding is it all can be found in one place now. No more flipping between books, unless of course you’re like me and have to own them all if you enjoy them.

FSF: Sounds amazing! So before Fallbrandt, you self published. What have been your biggest joys throughout the process? What were some of your biggest challenges or obstacles?

JM: My biggest joys have to be connecting with readers. I love the tags and random messages I’ve gotten. It’s so fun hearing what people think as they read, when they’ve finished, or even just seeing the book out in the world. The biggest challenge has been finding ways to market to readers. It’s just not my strong point, so most everything for me has been word of mouth. That’s been so much fun though. Getting to hear “my friend told me to read this and omg!” is a rush like no other. Someone recommended my book? Thank you random person!

FSF: Do you write with a certain audience or market in mind, or do you write for yourself in the hope that readers will come along for the ride?

JM: I write for myself and see what the story leans to then edit with that audience more in mind.

FSF: Many authors tend to use their own characteristics, and those of people in their personal lives in their writing. Is this something you do? It so provide some examples.

JM: Oh for sure. I am no exception there. My favorite example is probably from An Unexpected Brew where Arnessa says something along the lines of “do to who I am as a person, I’m going to be late” and it’s a direct reference to some writers I used to meet with all the time. No one was ever on time, and someone was always over the top late. In Fire’s Song Lee is referred to as a goody-two-shoes who wants to do everything to help everyone. That is directly my friend, who I wrote the book for. It is so much fun inserting those little things. I could really go on all day with examples.

FSF: Who are some of your influences that helped shape your work? Draw not only from books and authors but also, film, television and other media sources if you have them.

JM: I really love this question. The book side I talk about a lot, Ella Enchanted was huge in shaping my love of fantasy, intriguing plots, and that sweet happily ever after. For other media, well, it’s no surprise I am a huge cutesy movie fan. I love Disney, and Studio Ghilbi. The different fairytales, friendships, and small insights into different tales pulled from history and folklore are wonderfully inspiring. If I have a movie on in the background it is likely from one of those two.

FSF: How important is reader interaction to you as an indie author and how to you most prefer to network with your readers?

JM: I love reader interactions. I think it’s very important to be around to chat with readers when possible, and I’m usually around in the evenings to do so. Right now, I’ve been using facebook the most to interact with everyone. I have a group and page. I do use twitter a fair amount too.

FSF: So aside from “A Tune of Demons”, you have another completes series that Fallbrandt will be releasing later in the year. Can you talk a bit about that series as well as what you have in the works currently?

JM: The next series Fallbrandt is releasing is a little different from A Tune of Demons. The Fairytale Adventures series is a collection of three different fairytales done in a modern setting with the fourth and final book pulling them together for one last bigger adventure. Two of the story concepts are very well known, a Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast retelling. The third involves a prince who just does not want to have a ball. He much rather just chill and do things with his guild. Of course, things never go as planned since parents only sorta sometimes listen.

As for projects in the works I am in the editing and revising stages of another trilogy. It involves portals, realm hopping, and magical essence. I am really having a blast exploring a universe where magic is like a core. It’s in a single place, pulsing outward. The places closest have more magic than those further away until you get to places like our own world where there is no magic whatsoever. It’s been hilarious using modern slang and inventions in worlds it doesn’t belong with characters being confused since things like cell phones aren’t needed where you can use a pearl to do sort of a hologram communication on a whim. Compared to the other books there are a little darker notes, but it’s me, so things will end well. Eventually.

FSF: Sounds awesome! Now can you recommend some indie fantasy or sci-fi that you’ve read recently to our audience?

JM: Always! Recently I’ve really been getting into Annette Marie and her books, specifically the Guilded Codex: Spellbound series. Her main character Tori is the perfect combination of disaster, trainwreck, and hilariously witty. I’ve also really enjoyed rereading Kelly Blanchard’s Chronicles of Lorrek series. I know sometime in the nearish future she’ll be launching another series and want to be ready. Her deep fantasy scifi mesh universe is so vast I cannot wait to see what happens next. Lastly, while it hasn’t been my most top-rated read I haven’t been able to get Omeron by Alexander R Davis out of my head. I love when authors can pull you in that way. There was just something so different and fun about that universe it’s really hard to nail down what, but well worth giving a try if you haven’t checked it out yet.

FSF: And finally I like to end all of my interviews with this question. What piece of advice can you offer to new and aspiring authors?

JM: Get into a writing routine. It doesn’t have to be daily, but finding a certain time to dedicate just to writing is so helpful. Then use it. Waiting for inspiration sounds nice, but sadly there is no editing or fixing a blank page. It’s better to write a bunch of things you’ll fix or change later and get the project done than to never get it done at all. Just write -the easiest and yet the hardest advice to follow some days.

FSF: Well it was amazing talking to you, and best of luck with your huge year!

JM: Thank you! It was a lot of fun. I cannot wait to see how things go and where this path leads.

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Authors in Focus Episode 93: Interview with Zack Pieper by JMD Reid

Zack Pieper

Hi! Welcome to this episode of Authors in Focus Podcast. I’m James Reid, a fantasy author publishing as JMD Reid. This podcast is all about getting to know writers, their books, and what makes them tick.

We all have a storyteller inside of us. Join me as we find out what the rising stars and established voices in publishing have to say about their craft and inspiration.

I am excited to say that my second fantasy series has been released as Jewels of Illumination and the first book collection is out! Jewels of Illumination Books 1-3 can be bought or borrowed on Amazon!

Today, I’m joined by Zack Pieper! He is the author of the epic fantasy novel The Garden of Lies! You can follow him on FacebookTwitterMindsGoodreadsParlerOdyseeYouTube, and TikTok!

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COVER REVEAL: History of Sol – Ouroboros by Steven Dutch & Chris Masterton

BOOK BLURB

When Martian authorities board the cargo ship Galaxy to stop the crew conducting an illegal experiment, the unwanted attention threatens a critical trade deal with Outlaws. Under pressure from the Colonies to deliver an exigent package, they must find a way to make the trade and deliver the package, or bad things will happen.

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A Look at the Traveler’s Journal with Fantasy Author Tiffani Collins on the Books and Authors Podcast

Tiffani Collins Author photo with violin

This is the Books and Authors Fantasy Podcast Episode 168 with Tiffani Collins.

Good day and welcome to this episode of the Books and Authors Fantasy and Sci-Fi Podcast. I’m your host, podcaster and author of Fun Fantasy Reads, Jamie Davis. This podcast is exactly what the title says it is, a show focused on everything in fantasy books.

This show will cover everything to do with fantasy books. From Epic Fantasy, Urban Fantasy, Sword and Sorcery, and everything in between, expect to find the best and brightest authors from all the various corners of the fantasy book world. Plus we’ll add in a few other very special guests as well along the way.

Let’s jump in with my writing update this week. I’m deep into writing new chapters in the Accidental Monk, book 7 in my Accidental Traveler series. It’s fun revisiting the video game world of Fantasma with Cari Dix and her new accidental friend, Aiden. I can’t wait to share this new story with you.

In the meantime, I’m also getting things ready to launch my newest book, The Paramedic’s Sorceress, book 9 in the Extreme Medical Services series. I’m trying to get the audiobook done at the same time as the ebook and paperback. Stay tuned here for updates.

Okay, time for this week’s guest author, Tiffani Collins. She says she’s always been terrible at running, so she learned to ride horses. She was even worse at dancing, so she studied martial arts instead. She works at her local library where she gets to talk about books with other bookworms all day long.

She lives in a small rural town in the Sierra Nevada mountains of Northern California. When she’s not braiding hair at Renaissance Fairs, spending time with friends, or helping library patrons find their next favorite read, she’s working on her next writing project. Right now, that project is The Traveler’s Journal.

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Interview with Jonathan Pembroke

Jonathan Pembroke

Fantasy/Sci-Fi Focus: Hey Jonathan, how’s it going? How has this last year of insanity been treating you?

JP: It’s been crazy, for sure. My wife and I live in a rural area outside a small town, so we haven’t been as affected as many folks. We were kind of socially-distant before it was cool. Still, with everyone staying at home more, it’s given me a lot of time to write and I can’t complain about that.

FSF: I feel the same way in that I’ve always worked from home so I’ve actually been more productive. It’s been nice having my wife and kids around more. There’s a comfort in knowing they are close by. I do feel for the horrible effect it’s had on so many people though.

JP: Yeah, it is certainly a challenge for everyone. I know some folks that have been hit hard and I keep hoping for the best for everyone … and I keep hoping that as vaccines distribution continues, that things will ultimately calm down.

FSF: Absolutely. Let’s shift gears and talk about writing. When did you know you wanted to be an author, and describe the journey that led to your first published novel.

JP: I’ve been a closet writer since I was a kid. I’m an 80s kid, and I think I was about eight when Dungeons and Dragons started gaining popularity. Unfortunately, I spent a lot of years living in places where there weren’t many kids my age. So what does an introverted kid who loved fantasies and dragons do when he’s not in school? He writes, draws, creates. I think those formative years instilled the love in me. Around the same time, my dad took me to see the movie Dragonslayer. Somewhat hokey but it was enough, I went full-bore fantasy fan after that.

I wrote off and on as I was growing up but I didn’t start getting serious until about fifteen years ago, and that was all short stories.

Around 2012, I started developing an idea about mystical shrines that gave people gifts. That eventually grew into my first novel, Pilgrimage to Skara. I finished it in 2014 and self-published in in 2016.

FSF: Now you’ve since written a trilogy, called The Holly Sisters. Tell our readers about the series and why they should be bingeing it right now!

JP: The short version: faery gangsters! The Holly Sisters is about two faerys of the Holly Clan, Sydney and her big sister Marla. Marla ran way from Sylvan Valley (the faery homeland) where she ended up in Woodhollow, running a street gang of faeries, who deal drugs, loanshark, and tussle with other gangs for control of Woodhollow’s underworld. Years later, Sydney (the POV protagonist) joins her sister.

At its heart, Holly Sisters has two themes. One, is Sydney trying to find herself. All faeries in a clan share the same wing colors and she was born with different wings, which made her feel like an outcast. She’s got some bitterness and feelings of isolation, so it’s about her finding her way.

At the same time, it’s also about the relationship between the sisters. I don’t think we see enough healthy sister relationships in fantasy and I wanted to show that Sydney and Marla go from being estranged to accepting to loving each other over the course of the series.

FSF: Sounds amazing . Now you’ve self published your work up to this pint. What has been the biggest joy to you in that process? What have been your biggest challenges or obstacles?

JP: Oh, man. The biggest joys are almost too many to count. One, there’s accomplishment. It’s amazing to do this on your own. Two, the freedom. No deadlines, no publisher breathing down your neck. I was able to find a cover artist who did exactly what I wanted. Three, the self-published community is fantastic. I’ve met so many awesome people.

Obstacles? The only big one: getting my work in front of people. The marketing and publicity is a tall mountain to climb for a self-pubb’d author and there’s no one to help. You have to be aggressive and take some chances. It’s more work that I ever expected.

Having said that, even if I ever landed a traditional publishing deal, I wouldn’t stop self-publishing. I’m simply enjoying myself too much.

FSF: How important is reader interaction to you as a self published author? How do you most like to network with your readers?

JP: Utterly invaluable. I try to be accessible and open with anyone who shows interest in my writing–or really, in fantasy in general. I’m a heavy reader and I like talking about other books too. I try to maintain a positive attitude about my writing and I think it shows; some readers who didn’t care for my first book were willing to give another one a chance because I didn’t throw a fit over a bad review. Positivity and optimism really do help.

I mostly network through social media. I’m in a bunch of FB fantasy groups, though I read more than I post. Ditto Redditt Fantasy, and Goodreads. I’ve met a lot of people through all these avenues. I was on Twitter briefly but had a bad experience and my interaction there was minimal, so I’m not now. I keep hearing Instagram but I know bupkis about it. I have also gone to some craft / book fairs to set up my books for sale and interact with people, though with Covid those opportunities are more limited. Again, no matter what’s said, I just keep smiling.

FSF: How much of yourself and people in your personal life make it into your characters? I know it’s common for authors to draw from those sources.

JP: A lot of them are sarcastic when they’re under stress and I tend to be the same. I’m sure some unconscious influence creeps in but I can only think of one instance where I intentionally drew from real-life. In the Holly Sisters, one of the supporting characters, Vivian (one of the gang members) is a perpetually-happy bubbly blonde, who has a tendency to talk fast, wave her hands, and repeat certain catch phrases. In the end, Vivian ends of being one of the biggest ass-kickers of the series. She’s so similar in personality to my wife Lisa that anyone who knows us would pick up on it right away.

FSF: So when you write, do you ever write with a specific audience or market in mind, or do you basically write for yourself and your own enjoyment and hope that people will come along for the ride and share your vision?

JP: Definitely the second one. I’ve tried to do he first and it always feels plastic to me. So I write the stories I want, and I’ve accepted that not everyone wants the same kind of stories I do. As a reader, I’ve bounced hard off a lot of popular fantasy, so I get my tastes are different. I write the kind of tales I like to read: adventure tales, with some character development, and lots of banter.

On that note about specific audiences, I will point out that all my books are written for adults. Even though they are about faeries, elves, leprechauns, etc., the characters drink, swear, bash each other in the heads, and sleep around. This has created a few awkward moments when an eleven-year old see faeries on the covers and gets interested and I have to explain things to Mom or Dad. Never a dull moment!

FSF: They say every poet is a thief, and naturally I’d apply that to authors too. We all have our influences that tend to find their way into our work, as original as we’d like it to be. Who are some of your biggest influences on your art. Draw not only from books and authors but also film, television, music etc.

JP: In a general sense, Stephen King and Michael Moorcock were huge early influences–King for his creativity and sheer productivity, and Moorcock for the memorable characters and depth of his world-building. I read a lot of comics growing up and I get the impression that many comic writers in the 70s and 80s were frustrated novelists, since comics are probably the foundation of my vocabulary. In specific, I know the nucleus of The Holly Sisters came from me watching the movie Gangs of New York. I started imagining that, rather than Civil-War-era gangs of immigrants and natives fighting for control of the streets, it was mystical races. I wrote a 4K-word short story about that, which was ultimately the foundation for Rumble in Woodhollow, the first book in the series.

FSF: So what’s next that readers can look forward to from you in the next year?

JP: I had never planned to write a sequel to Pilgrimage to Skara. Its reviews haven’t been great. But it has a handful of fans and there is still some story there, so I am going to tell that tale and close the loop. I would like to have that out by the end of the year.

I also have a (revised) draft of the first book in a new series done and looking for some beta readers. Tentative title is The Sentinel, about a middle-aged woman who’s part of a specialized military force who helps protect her world from an encroaching darkness that has taken over much the land. Borderline flintlock fantasy, though with a blend of magic and technology. This will probably be a four-book series, though none of those will be out before 2022 at the earliest.

And if anyone reads The Holly Sisters and thinks the story should go on, fear not–it is! I’m working out plots for the next series featuring the same characters … the ones that survive, anyway.

FSF: Sounds awesome. Lots to look forward to. Now I was wondering if you could recommend some indie fantasy or science fiction that you’ve read over the last couple of years to our audience.

JP: Sure, and I’ll steer away from the stock answers for indy fantasy. Reign and Ruin, by JD Evans is a political-fantasy set in a Syrian-Lebanese-influenced world, with good characters and an interesting magic system. There is a romantic subplot and a bit of steaminess but the whole thing is well-written. I think it’s a planned six-book series and three are out now.

Also, I’d recommend Lost Dogs, by Nils Odlund. The series concerns an aging pit-fighter in an MMA-style lycnathrope league, and a young woman who’s struggling to control her own inner beast. It’s all set in a modern but secondary world with an underlying hint of decay. Brooding and introspective, with some outbursts of intense action. Ten books in the series, with the last just released; all ten are short can be devoured in a night or two.

FSF: Awesome. More for the already mountainous TBR pile. Now I like to end all my interviews with this question. What one piece of advice can you offer to new and aspiring authors?

JP: Don’t quit. If you’re loving what you’re doing and you get joy out of it, don’t give up. You’ll want to at time. You’ll get frustrated. You’ll get discouraged. Stick with it. You remember that person who gave up too early? Neither does anyone else.

FSF: Well, thanks for taking the time. It was cool talking to you and best of luck with your year!

JP: Thanks, Michael. Best to you and yours, and all the F/SF Focus crowd. Cheers!

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Authors in Focus Episode 92: Interview with Steven Erikson by JMD Reid

Steven Erikson

Hi! Welcome to this episode of Authors in Focus Podcast. I’m James Reid, a fantasy author publishing as JMD Reid. This podcast is all about getting to know writers, their books, and what makes them tick.

We all have a storyteller inside of us. Join me as we find out what the rising stars and established voices in publishing have to say about their craft and inspiration.

I am excited to say that my second fantasy series has been released as Jewels of Illumination and the first book collection is out! Jewels of Illumination Books 1-3 can be bought or borrowed on Amazon!

Today, I’m joined by Steven Erikson! He is the author of the best-selling Malazan Book of the Fallen and Willful Child, a Star Trek parody series!

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Interview with Evangeline Rain

Evangeline Rain

Fantasy/Sci-Fi Focus (FSF): Hi Evangeline! How’s it going? How has this crazy year been treating you?

Evangeline Rain (ER): Hi Michael! I think everyone around the world has been very affected and it’s crazy indeed! I hope the crazy tones down soon.

FSF: I fully agree. It handy effected us much due to the fact that I already worked from home and I’ve actually gotten more time with my family but I know it’s had a devastating effect on so many.

ER: I think working from home crosses many lines though. It’s hard when we’re expected to operate professionally when the kids are running amok at home. It drove me to quit my day job of 16 years when the lockdown entered the second month.

FSF: Well I hope we can end it all this year and begin some form of normalcy again. So I did have a question to start us out. When did you know you wanted to be a writer and describe the journey that led to your first published novel.

ER: I’ve always wanted to write, but it’s not deemed as a “proper” job so I didn’t really pursue it. 2 years ago, one of the reader groups I was in organized a small writing competition. I joined for fun and won the third place. I think that’s when I started to have to courage to write for real.

However that novel didn’t take off because the story was going nowhere, it was lacking. I was fortunate enough to get my first set of tips from Vicki Stiefel. She was very generous and encouraging. I learned a lot. Subsequently, I sent my manuscript to various competitions to get feedback to improve on my writing.

It was quite a long, bumpy road before the first book was published, but I’m very glad I did and very proud that I managed to pull through the process.

FSF: So I’d like to talk about your Chikara Revolution series and specifically the first novel Fatal Extraction. Can you tell our audience a bit about the book and why it should be their next click?

ER: I love watching Sci Fi movies, but I felt that the men were stealing the show. I wanted a Sci Fi like the Resident Evil series where Alice was the kickass lead throughout. Then I came across Monica Enderle Pierce’s Glass and Iron series and I got very inspired. I thought maybe I could try to combine everything. I must say it was a tad too ambitious for a debut novel but I had a lot of fun writing it.

The book revolves around a female pirate, Nirvana Faust, my version of Han Solo, and a high-ranking officer, Zane, who had just defected from his planet. They were forced by circumstances to work together in a difficult mission. Nirvana, being much older, didn’t think much of Zane at first, especially when he looked very unsure of himself, nerdy and all. Besides, she’s used to being the boss and being in control.

However, as the book progresses, she learned that he was not what he seemed, and it was dangerous to keep underestimating him. She was torn between trusting him as a partner, but not knowing what other surprises he might spring on her.

When I wrote the book, I visualized it like an action-packed movie, so that’s how it turned out. The first book introduces the story arc in the series, and the subsequent books will feature different romantic pairs with recurring characters. Readers, like me, who don’t enjoy slow burn romance that are stretched over a few books, will enjoy this series.

FSF: Sounds amazing. Do you write with a particular audience in mind or do you write for yourself and hope that readers will come along for the ride?

ER: This is an excellent question. I started out writing what I wanted to read, so it’s more for myself. Later on, I realized it’s not how this industry works. I cannot keep writing for myself. While I hope to find my own tribe, I’m studying the other authors to see how I can try to find the balance in writing to market, and maintaining my individuality at the same time. However, I still want to explore different genres against the better advice of the more experience authors. I’m still finding my niche..

FSF: As a self published author, what has been your biggest joy in the experience and what have been your biggest challenges or obstacles?

ER: My biggest joy has been finding readers who enjoy my books. The best are those who enjoyed all, even though I switched genres. Their affirmation and reviews kept me going.

The biggest challenge would be finding these readers and trying to make my books reach more people. As a self-published author I have to fork out money to produce and market a book. The costs incurred keep snowballing and thus, my day job is needed to feed these expenses until I get more sales.

FSF: How much of yourself and those in your personal life make it into the characters that you write about?

ER: I would deny vehemently that my books reflects my personality, but my close friends who had read my books said they could see me clearly in all the characters and their behaviour. I guess the way I write also reflects my views on some of the issues happening around the world.

FSF: What are some of your biggest influences in all media forms (not only books and authors) that have inspired your work?

ER: Movies and computer games are my biggest influences. I would say they influence me even more than books and authors because I am very visual. I often find it hard to form a detailed mental image based on descriptions alone, but a picture is worth a thousand words. When I’m out of creative juice or stuck in a writing rut, I’d catch a couple of movies and watch the cut scenes from various computer games on YouTube. It’ll usually help get my writing mood back on.

FSF: As an indie author, how important is reader interaction to you? How do you like to network with your readers?

ER: I haven’t gotten many readers yet. Those who write to me gets my next book free. I’m never going to earn anything like that, but it shows how much I appreciate them reaching out to me and affirming me. I believe all authors, established or not, need affirmation from their readers. I would ask all of mine to email me at authorerain@gmail.com. I often invite them to pitch in ideas for my next book too.

FSF: Speaking of which, what’s next for you? What can readers look forward to in the coming year?

ER: I’m working on Book 3 of The Chikara Revolution, taking the advice of my author friends to try to write a little more of one genre before jumping around.

Then I will work on Book 2 of my Chinese Historical Romance. This one took me by surprise because I wrote Book 1 on a whim, I didn’t expect readers to want more. These two are confirmed and in the works.

After that I’ll see if I have any inspiration for Book 3. If not, I’ll work on expanding a 5k word piece which I submitted for a GrimDark magazine. Naturally I didn’t make it because it was not grim and dark enough. I think it might turn it into a paranormal romcom. I also have ideas for a contemporary romcom. I’ll decide later after I finish my intended books for this year.

FSF: Sounds like an amazing year. Can you recommend some indie fantasy or science fiction to our audience that you’ve read recently?

ER: I feel Monica Enderle Pierce’s Glass and Iron series is not getting enough attention. I love it. I want to get more people to read it. The most recent indie fantasy I’ve read is JC Kang’s Thorn of the Night Blossom. I’m really looking forward to his Quantum Cultivation, a Xianxia/Cyberpunk novel that’s coming out next month!

FSF: Finally I like to end all of my interviews with this question. What one piece of advice can you offer to new and aspiring authors?

ER: I’m not experienced enough to give much advice yet, but I’d say join all the author groups, especially 20booksto50k on Facebook. Ask as many questions as possible and learn as much as you can before you publish your first book. I regretted not doing that. If you have the funds, and you want your writing journey to be as smooth and successful as possible, hire a reputable book coach.

FSF: Thanks for being here. It was great talking to you.

ER: Thank you for your time!

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Daniel Potter’s Full Moon Medic on the Books and Authors Fantasy and SciFi Podcast

This is the Books and Authors Fantasy Podcast Episode 167 with Daniel Potter.

Good day and welcome to this episode of the Books and Authors Fantasy and Sci-Fi Podcast. I’m your host, podcaster and author of Fun Fantasy Reads, Jamie Davis. This podcast is exactly what the title says it is, a show focused on everything in fantasy books.

This show will cover everything to do with fantasy books. From Epic Fantasy, Urban Fantasy, Sword and Sorcery, and everything in between, expect to find the best and brightest authors from all the various corners of the fantasy book world. Plus we’ll add in a few other very special guests as well along the way.

Kicking things off this week with my author update, I’ve got The Paramedic’s Sorceress, book 9 in the Extreme Medical Services series, with the editor. While it’s there, I’ve started working again on Accidental Monk, book 7 in my Accidental Traveler series.

It’s always a challenge getting back into a book I put on the shelf halfway through. However, I’m loving the stuff I’m reading and think I wrote a pretty compelling start to this book. I’m aiming to finish this draft in the next 30 days or so. I’m looking forward to getting on with this series.

This week on the show, I chat with author Daniel Potter. His most recent book is killing it with readers right now. He writes about creatures that are generally considered highly improbable, from talking cats, flying reptiles made of living metal and people who sprout foot long talons when annoyed. As a biologist he should know better but he’s always ready to leave reality outside if needs too, no matter how much it scratches at the door.

He’s the author of three series, Freelance Familiars, a unique and proper take on urban fantasy from the familiar’s perspective, Rise of the Horned Serpent which is best described as Sky Pirates Versus Dragons, and The Full Moon Medic, where the end of the world is magic.

When he’s not chasing his imagination, his imagination is usually chasing him, whether while he’s cooking lunch for his spouse, playing video game or fending off two cats who always insist its dinner time.

Check out my fun chat with Daniel coming right up!

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